Meet The Author Monday – Reid Templer

This week’s Meet The Author Monday is Reid Templer, who has his debut novel available on Amazon now. Per usual, my questions/comments will be in BLUE and Reid will be in GREEN.

Thank you for stopping by, Reid. It’s always a pleasure to get to meet a new author and find out about the origins of their forays into the literary world. What was your introduction?
At the age of thirteen, my father gave me two books which were dear to him: The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane and the Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis. Both bored me. The symbolism, theology, and meaning of each went over my head, naturally, and, for a time, I was convinced that books simply didn’t suit me. This changed about two years later, when I happened on a copy of Inkheart by Cornelia Funke. I became enthralled in her trilogy, and haven’t stopped reading since.

I agree that Crane might be a bit of heavy reading for the average 13-year-old. From Inkheart, you began delving into what genre(s)?
I predominantly read fantasy, although Horror and Science Fiction do interest me a great deal.

Sounds like we have similar tastes. We might have to compare reading lists sometime. What made you decide to cross over from reading stories to writing your own?
When I was fourteen, I experienced a dream which would inspire my first (and thankfully unpublished) novel. A year later, when I had finished Christopher Paolini’s Eragon, I learned that the author had published the book at eighteen years old. I don’t know exactly what drove me to it, but from that day onward, I strove to publish a story before I turned eighteen. In this regard, I failed, but it did motivate me to write every day.

Paolini did have an advantage in that his parents were involved in the publishing industry. Can’t be too hard on yourself over that. What is your chosen genre to write?
Right now I would consider myself a fantasy writer, although, within time, I hope to develop a story in every major genre.

Ambitious goals. I wish you the best of luck with your goal. How has your publishing journey gone for you so far?
For the past three years, I’ve been writing, editing, and rewriting my newest novel, Storytellers. It was a hard journey, fraught with doubt, but I’m proud of the completed work.

Congratulations. It’s an incredible feeling to hold that published work in your hands. Outside of writing, what are you currently working on?
I’m currently pursuing a Sign Language Interpreting degree.

Interesting career path. Tell us a little bit about your book.
Thank you for taking interest in my interview. The book I’m promoting is Storytellers, which is available in paperback at any major book distributor and on Kindle for ebook. Here’s a short blurb:
After the gods and goddesses known as Storytellers conceive children who threaten their immortality, Pokeetle and his allies must fight to keep their offspring from being sacrificed for power.
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Thank you for coming by and talking with me today. Your book looks interesting and I wish you the best with it and your future works.

If anyone would like to keep up on Reid’s work, you can follow him on Twitter @ReidTempler

Anyone interested in being featured on Meet the Author Monday, please check out the form and let us know all about you.

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Meet The Author Monday – David L Heaney

Hello my Gentle Readers. I know our Meet The Author Monday has been a little thin lately, but I have a couple lined up for this week and next that I hope you will enjoy and check out what they have to offer. This week we will be talking with David L Heaney, a former pastor turned writer with his spiritual adventure, A Yorkie’s Tale: Lessons from a Life Well-Lived. Usual format applies with myself in BLUE and David in GREEN.fullsizeoutput_23e7
David, first off thanks for taking time to speak with us. Your book looks like a wonderful tale. Let’s start off with how you came to the world of literature and reading. 
I spent one year away at a Prep School in Peekskill, NY mostly because I had been doing poorly in school and was in and out of trouble. I hated that year. There was, however, one teacher who told me he thought I wrote well and would write better still, if I read more. He didn’t care what I read, just as long as I read. We had mandatory study hall after dinner so I read a lot of racy Harold Robbins books. I suppose that was when reading just became a part of each day.

A bit of a troublemaker, huh? Fascinating that you became a pastor then. After finishing with Harold Robbins, what genre did you explore? Who became your favorites?
I have always loved writers like John Updike, John Cheever, William Styron- I guess that’s literary realism. I also love biographies. More recently, I have been drawn to fantasy having recently completed a couple of Neil Gaiman books. I loved Phillip Pullman’s new book, Dust: La Belle Sauvage.

Gaiman is a favorite. So at some point you decided to not just read, but create your own stories. What inspired you to make that leap?
I was a parish minister for many years and was struck by the drama of people’s lives. I suppose this was because I was so often with people as they negotiated their way through critical developmental milestones. I also was obliged to write sermons for Sundays. I learned over time that stories were more powerful than traditional sermons. Stories also somehow help one make sense of experience. So, I learned that writing about things helped me better understand them.

From sermons to published author. Very interesting. Do you feel confined to one genre when you write or are you exploring several?
I dabble in in several genres. I surprised myself when I began A Yorkie’s Tale since I had never considered writing epic fantasy but enjoyed it quite a bit and am working on another fantasy story. I also enjoy writing personal essays.

Fantasy is my favorite genre so I’m always delighted to meet new fantasy authors. Can you tell us about your journey with “A Yorkie’s Tale”? How did it go from draft to available on Amazon?
A Yorkie’s Tale is my first book and most earnest attempt to publish in the traditional manner. It was a frustrating business to attempt to go the traditional route since I was a novice. Agents want to represent someone known. Publishers read manuscripts from agents. As the form letters stated-“We get X thousands of manuscripts every month…” so I understand it’s a very competitive business. I finally opted to self publish and am quite happy with how it all went. I found a wonderful illustrator who helped bring my characters to life and again, I’m quite pleased with how it all turned out. We’ll see about the next one.

When that next one is going to hit the shelves, would love to have you back to talk about it. When you aren’t writing, how do you like to spend your time? Is there a day job now that you have retired from being a pastor?
I have a small consulting firm with two UK-based partners. I worked internationally for a number of years in the area of public health and human services that were contracted out to private companies. My firm continues to represent companies interested in doing business with governments largely in Australia, the UK, and the US.
My wife, Lynda and I moved to Durham, NC with our 3 dogs from San Diego 4 years ago. She took a job at Duke Medicine and I work from home. Our five grown children and 3 grandchildren all still live in San Diego.

Sounds like you keep very busy. I’m glad you carved out the time to visit with me. You have a funny story about how you began your novel to share with us. Let’s hear all about it.
I lived for a year in London a couple of years ago. My flat was located on Poppins Court (yes, named for Mary Poppins). That’s where I started A Yorkie’s Tale. Our Yorkshire Terrier in San Diego started to get fat and we couldn’t figure out why. We later discovered he was eating the avocados that dropped from our neighbor’s tree. One lonely weekend afternoon at the Pub I started the story – the Yorkie in the backyard eating avocados.

And now that Yorkie is inspiring and helping people all over the world through your story. Wonderful. Thank you again David for visiting and please let us know when your next tale will be coming.

If you would like to follow David and learn more about him and his work, you can connect with him at the below links.

69555337_High Resolution Front Cover.7238367.jpg On Amazon

Website: http://somethingtosaydotblog.wordpress.com

Twitter: @dlheaney

Instagram: heaneydavid

 

And if any of you would like to be featured on Meet The Author Monday, you can contact me here.

Meet The Author Monday – Jenn Bregman

Today, my Gentle Readers, I have a lawyer turned author for you to meet. Jenn Bregman’s first book, The TimeKeepers, is available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. As usual, I will have my questions/comments in BLUE and Jenn will be in GREEN.
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Jenn, Thank for coming to visit us today. Let’s jump right in and get to know you. Tell us about your early reading experiences.
I have been a voracious (yes, think giant dinosaur teeth!) reader since I was a kid. During elementary school, I would hop on my bike, go to the library every day in the summer, check-out as many books as I could fit into my basket, pedal home, read them all, and then repeat the next day. I just couldn’t get enough books! And I had friends, so go figure? It must have been whatever secret sauce was in those books . . .

That sounds like a great summer to me. After you finished devouring whole libraries as a kid, what genre did you settle on as a favorite?
I love my genre — thrillers! I also love the subcategories — legal thrillers, mysteries, historical thrillers. And I love biographies of people I admire.

What made you cross that line from just devouring these books to creating one of your own?
It really was the process of writing on Law Review in Law School and then writing my article that got published in the UCLA Law Review. The reason, I think, was that it was SO hard. Every part of it was hard. The research, writing, and editing were incredibly demanding and I didn’t know if I could do it. But then, when it was done and published, I thought maybe, just maybe, I could write. And I was proud of the effort and the product. “Trial” so to speak, by fire!

Very punny for a lawyer *wink*. I’m guessing on your particular flavor to write, but do you find yourself dabbling into other areas or sticking with the one path?
I only write legal thrillers, with perhaps some elements of mystery and history mixed in. That is my voice.

Admirable that you have found your niche. Run with it. We can’t let Grisham have all the best legal thrillers. Tell us a little about your journey as a writer.
I love that you use the word “journey,” because it is. First, you need to have something that you “have” to write, it’s not enough to “want” to, you need to “have” to. Then, of course, is the actual writing followed by editing, editing and more editing. After that initial process, I contacted an agent who I knew through a friend, who was wonderful and supportive and gave me some very good ideas about how to improve the work. I implemented those and then was lucky enough to receive even more helpful advice from other agents and friends. My biggest surprise about the whole process was the kindness many showed me by people in the industry. Criticism was truly constructive and given gracefully and with a generous spirit. These people gave me the greatest gift of all — their time — and for that, I am forever grateful.

Sounds like you have some great connections. Maybe I can borrow them one day. Just kidding. When you aren’t taking the legal world, literary and for real, by storm, what keeps you busy?
I am a crazy adventurer and love running marathons, hiking fourteeners, scuba diving and other physical pursuits that challenge me and scare me. I adore my family and friends and spend a lot of time with both. And, although I’m not practicing law anymore, I enjoy working with my bar associations and their causes. I also try to do one thing that stretches me (either physically — ha!, emotionally, intellectually or spiritually) every day.

That sounds like a great philosophy. Did you have anything else you wanted to share with my readers?
Finally, it seems that a lot of us crazy readers are also crazy closet writers. As I answered the question about the “journey” above, it struck me that we all have our journey and our story to tell. So, whoever, is reading this, I encourage you to tell your story if you at all want to. Write it. Don’t criticize it, just finish it. Who knows? It might be really good.

Sound advice, Counselor. Something that everyone should take under advisement. Thank you again for stopping by, Jenn.

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If you want to find out more about Jenn or her book, The TimeKeepers, you can find her at the following links.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter
Instagram

If you would like to be a guest on Meet The Author Mondays, just Click Here to find all the details and submit your information.

 

Meet The Author Monday – Randi Lynn Mrvos

My Gentle Readers, I have an author dedicated to children to introduce you to today. Randi Lynn Mrvos produces an online children’s magazine called, Kid’s Imagination Train. She released her first children’s picture book August 23rd, 2017. As usual, my comments/questions will be in BLUE and Randi Lynn’s will be in GREEN.

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It’s so nice to have you here today, Randi. It’s not often I get to talk to children’s book writers, and your magazine looks amazing. Let’s begin at the beginning, as they say. What dropped you into the literary world? Were you an avid reader from a young age or was it later in life?
I was a voracious reader when I was young.  During the summers, my brothers and I had “reading wars” to see which one of us could read the most books.  Back then, my favorite books were by Charles Dickens and Jules Verne.  On the other hand, I gave up reading books for fun after graduating as a medical technologist because I got burned out on studying.  However, a few years later that changed when I witnessed a blind man crossing a busy New York City street.  That’s when it dawned on me that I could open a book and read it; whereas, he would never see the words on a page. 

Very inspiring, and very true. So you started with two of the greats, what draws you in these days now that you have returned to world of reading?
Pulitzer Prize winning novels and children’s picture books are my favorite kinds of books as well as the hilarious books by Sempé-Goscinny.

Have to keep an eye on what’s out there if you are going to write for children. When did you start considering the path of being a writer?
The seed for writing was planted when I took a creative writing class in the tenth grade.  Believe it or not, I still have my writing journal complete with stories that were inspired by magazine pictures.  

I remember doing some of those exercises as well. Seems to be a standard fit for high school english, especially for creative writing portions of the year. Where did you go from these early years of magazine inspiration?
In the early days of my career, I wrote technical articles for medical technology journals, testing passages for elementary-age children for Pearson Digital Learning, and science articles for children.  After widely publishing nonfiction, I pursued my dream of writing fiction for kids.

How did this dream of writing fiction for kids lead you to where you are now?
Every single picture book that I wrote was rejected.  Since I was dying to see my work in print, I found it was easier to get magazine articles published because nonfiction was less subjective than fiction.  As my credits grew, I focused on developing the craft of writing fiction for kids by taking writing classes, attending writing workshops and conferences, and joining a professional writer’s organization.  Though this helped me to grow as a writer, I still couldn’t find a publisher for my stories.  I desperately wanted to get out of this rut, so I hired editorial consultant Mary Kole.  We worked on my favorite manuscript, and several months later, I sent it to five publishers.  Not long after, the creative director for Saturn’s Moon Press sent me a contract for Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show-and-Tell.

That’s wonderful that you found a home for one of your stories. All the effort and work you put in has paid off it seems. When you aren’t writing for children, how do you like to spend your time?
Marketing my first picture book takes up beaucoup de time as well as being the editor of Kid’s Imagination e-zine.  I enjoy traveling, taking ballet and learning how to parlez-vous French. 

I’ll leave the French to you. I took German in school and can’t really speak a lick of it anymore. I understand that you have a little story to share with us?
Last fall, my husband and I decided to celebrate our birthdays in New Orleans.  When we arrived in the Big Easy, we biked through NOLA, listened to jazz, and chowed down Cajun food.  Often, our footsteps led us through Jackson Square.  There, we found people playing music, drawing portraits, taking carriage rides, and having their fortunes read.  I was itching to meet a fortune-teller.  I selected a psychic, who she invited me to sit at her table.  She told me to choose a jeweled stone and three cards, and make three wishes.  One of my wishes was to get a book published.  After she studied the cards and the stone, she told me good things were going to happen.

The next evening, I scrolled through my emails.  I discovered an email from a publisher.  It was from the creative director of a Cactus Moon Publications.  She wrote that she liked my book!  Sometimes, wishes really do come true.

Amazing and congratulations on your successes. Thank you again for stopping by. If anyone would like to get more information about Randi Lynn Mrvos and her work for children, you can find her at the below links.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter @RandiLynnMrvos
Pinterest
Kid’s Imagination Train.

If any of you would like to be featured on Meet the Author Monday, you can get more information by clicking HERE.

Meet The Author Monday – William Fietzer

Today my Gentle Readers, I have a new author for you to meet. His name is William Fietzer and he has three titles available on Amazon exploring such topics as crime and technology, with his latest adding in paranormal and the concept of a collective unconsciousness. As usual, my comments/questions will be in BLUE and we will have William’s responses in GREEN.

missionsoulrescuemetadatamurderspenalfires

 

William, thank you for stopping by to talk to us and share a little about yourself and your work. You have some diversity in your portfolio already. What got you started in the literary world?
Gosh, I think it goes back years ago to my babysitter (a elementary ed teacher) who read to her own slightly older children (before the age of day care) and I wanted in. After that, my parents, grade-school teachers, and librarians encouraged me to read and I had them read (and later on read myself) all of Aesop’s fables and Black Beauty (wotta tear-jerker) to me.
After I discovered Walter Farley‘s books and devoured all of them in print, I began to write my first novel, “Black Phantom,” a story that never got beyond the cover design though I still promise myself to fill the covers with a manuscript.
After that I read anything that came my way and decided to become an English major in college. But it was really during my stint in the army that I completed reading all the popular writers like Norman Mailer, James Baldwin, and Ken Kesey along with “disreputable” ones like D. H. Lawrence, Henry Miller, and William Burroughs to complete my literary education.
Since then, I’ve come to consider Marcel Proust (for his style and breadth of thought), Graham Greene (for the variety of his characters and settings), and Colin Wilson (for his concept of the outsider and his investigations of the paranormal) as role models. Oh, and Raymond Chandler just because.

Bit of a whirlwind tour of great authors there. I’ll have to link them up for my readers to follow along with your journey if they choose. Do you find yourself gravitating towards a particular genre these days?
I don’t consider myself a genre reader. I just read what interests me at the moment. That may be anything from metaphysical fiction to forensic anthropology. My reading may not be as broad as it was earlier in my life, but I read much more deeply and intensely.

All this reading seems to have inspired you, as you started a novel early in your life. What truly pushed you over that line from just reading great stories, to wanting to put your own into the world?
I mentioned before my first (unsuccessful) attempt at writing a novel. Though I aspired to become a writer during my undergraduate days, it took me years to shake off the inhibitions incurred as a graduate student of English before I gained enough confidence to write and complete a work of fiction.
I edited and wrote for several pre-professional library publications during this period, but it was only after I submitted (one minute before the deadline) a teleplay to a local PBS station contest that I gained the confidence to complete a full-length fiction manuscript. And then it was another fifteen years before my first novel, “Penal Fires,” was published.

Sometimes it takes awhile to get that first story into the world before the floodgates open. With the breadth of your reading history, do you find yourself drawn to write any particular genre, or are you looking at diversifying there as well?
I’ve written in several, starting out as a traditional mystery/thriller writer and graduating (some might say devolving) into a metaphysical writer.

As long as it is the stories you want to tell, who cares whether the critics think you graduated or devolved, right? So, three books under your belt but that’s not all for your literary career. How did your journey play out?
If you’ve read this far (Good for you–such endurance!), you’ll notice a progression in content from literary fiction to what I call visionary thriller. My first story, “Special Training,” was based on a tragic experience witnessed during the Vietnam War. My teleplay, “A Question of Benefit,” was based on a person I encountered during this same period. Both of them are what I’d say were in the mainstream literary tradition.
But as with graduate school, I chafed at the restrictions and conventions placed upon the writers of this genre. My life experiences showed me there were many more interesting people and topics to write about than sensitive loners learning to expiate the slights (real and imagined) against them through writing.
That’s when I discovered Raymond Chandler. Though in retrospect I realize his writing is as stylized and conventional as much of the stuffy stuff I was reading in graduate school, his attitude (or voice) and subject matter were a breath of fresh air to me. I could never write about the mean streets his characters explored, but I could adapt those situations to my own experiences and find my own, not-so-sardonic voice.
My first novel, “Penal Fires” was the result. An outpouring of my experiences in Madison, Wisconsin both before and after the bombing of Bascom Hall, the book is a conventional mystery thriller.
A few years later, my second novel, “Metadata Murders,” extended the tropes of the mystery thriller into the realm of the Dark Web where the hidden, almost fantastical powers of the Internet could make anything possible in real life–even murder.
And finally, my latest novel, “Mission: Soul Rescue,” takes the almost mystical possibilities of the Internet one step farther by exploring the potentials and complexities of accessing and releasing the power of the unconscious mind, not to mention the danger from the psychic vampires who feed off such energy.

Fascinating journey William. I’m sure you have more ‘devolving’ to do as you continue your writing path. When you put down the keyboard, or pen, what do you like to do? What keeps you busy outside of writing?
I’ve been retired for several years from my roles as a cataloger and bibliographer for the University of Minnesota Libraries, as an instructor of English and business writing for Rasmussen and National American Universities, and as a contributor and reviewer for the online news site, examiner.com.
Currently, on those days not devoted to writing, I play golf and serve as president of the senior league at Highland Nine golf course in St. Paul, Minnesota. My wife and I also visit our sons and daughters-in-law on the East Coast and recently welcomed our first grandchild, a boy, into the world in March of this year, all of which has made our Norwegian Forest cat, mightily perplexed and annoyed by our occasional abdications of fealty to her needs and desires.

Cats can be fairly territorial when it comes to the loyalty of their subjects. Congratulations on the grandchild. I’m certain he will keep you busy. I know you have an interesting tale to tell with regards to your latest work, so let’s hear it.
This is one of those situations like being in an elevator with an agent and you have 90 seconds to “wow” him/her with the essence of your story. When I attended ThrillerFest the first time, I managed to be successful in convincing eight agents to look at my manuscript. But each of them returned it, saying something noncommittal like it didn’t meet their current needs.
But one advised me to join a writing group and get other people’s reactions to what I’d written. Their comments and those of the editor my future publisher recommended helped me realize the limitations of the manuscript I originally submitted.
With their comments as a guide, I converted a promising manuscript into one acceptable enough to a publisher for me to sign a contract. From there it was only a short 18 months and numerous rewrites that transformed that unmarketable manuscript into “Mission: Soul Rescue.”

That is great, William. Sometimes a rejection can open a different door and I’m glad it worked out for you. If anyone would like to get their hands on more information about William Fietzer and his works, or keep up with any future releases, you can find him at the links below.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter @ELstir1
William Fietzer on Amazon

 

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Meet The Author Monday – Kirsten McKenzie

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I want to thank you stopping by to talk with us today, Kirsten. Let’s kick things off with a little background. What brought you to the world of literature?
My father was an antique dealer, so my bedroom was stuffed full of hardcover copies of almost every Enid Blyton book ever printed, and numerous other classics. I always had something to read. It’d because of Enid Blyton’s books that I developed a love of reading and storytelling. And its because of my father that my books are stuff full of antiques!

That sounds like an exciting childhood. What genre, or genres, really draw you in?
Sweeping historical fiction, in the vein of Edward Rutherfurd’s huge tomes – London, Paris, Sarum etc. His storytelling is incredible especially the way he weaves all the threads together.

I’ve never been one to read fantasy books, until I read George RR Martin’s Game of Thrones series. His descriptive details are perfect.

And Stephen King of course. All his books, even the ones I have to read with my eyes closed because I’m too scared…

Of course the King of Horror. One of my all time favorites as well. Is there any particular event that brought you across that line from reader to writer?
The Discovery of Witches series by Deborah Harkness are the books which inspired me to write. Is there anything more exciting than the ability to slip through time? To meet someone inspirational from the past?

Deborah Harkness has a wonderful series there. I have read some of her work. Have you chosen a specific genre or are you dabbling in more than one? 
I’ve written two historical time slip books, and I am about to publish my first horror novel. So yes, you can safely assume that I am dabbling in genres now.

A double threat then. How has your publishing journey been?
My first two books were published by Accent Press in the UK.
My horror novel will be published by Squabbling Sparrows Press in New Zealand due to it being a horror novel, and not historical fiction.

That’s great. When you aren’t taking on two genres, what fills your time?
My Twitter bio sums it up really:

Author. Actor. Antique Dealer. Mother. Wife. World Traveler.

I love traveling. I’m a full time author. The mother of two daughters. And the wife of a husband. I don’t do as much acting now as I did before publishing my books. And I will always love antiques, and the thrill of stumbling across some piece of treasure hidden in a drawer or a forgotten box.

Sounds like you have a full plate. I understand you have a story you want to share with us about your father’s antique shop. Please do.
When I was little, I was allowed to sell 50c postcards in the corner of our family antique shop. Then I progressed to being behind the counter. After my father died, my brother and I ran the shop together. Now I write about the things in the shop, and the customers, and the treasures, weaving stories around them. Its a passion, and it filters through to all aspects of my writing. A reviewer once described my writing as “Antiques Roadshow gone viral”.

Certainly looks like you have some interesting reads for our To Be Read pile. Thank you again for stopping by today Kirsten and I wish you luck with your work. If anyone would like to follow Kirsten and her work, you can do so at the following links.
And if anyone would like to be a part of our Meet the Author Monday feature, you can sign up by clicking HERE.

Meet the Author Monday – P.J. Mann

Today my Gentle Readers, I would like to introduce you to P. J. Mann. I’m excited for you to meet this fellow indie author, so let’s get to it. My questions/comments will be in BLUE and P.J.’s will be in GREEN.
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P.J. I love your graphic on your Facebook and website. Thank you for coming to visit with me today. It’s always fascinating to learn what started off authors as readers. How did it begin for you?
What made me a reader was just the passion of reading since the elementary school. I loved the places I could visit without even the need of moving away from my room. Perhaps I started to read less when I started to be a writer, mostly it is a lack of time. Being an indie author means that I have to do all the marketing on my own together with trying and produce something new, and that is a full-time activity that leaves little time for the rest.

Self Publishing, they tell us it is hard work but we all think it will be different. I know how that goes myself. So what genres do you enjoy the most?
Mainly I like crime and mystery, but also comedy books or erotica.

When did you decide you were not content just to read the works of other authors and wanted to create your own?
I started to write since I was a teenager, but that was not something meant to be a professional work. Mostly it was to discharge frustrations and to analyze myself. The real turning point was a few years ago, when life seemed to be a downhill road, and I needed something to keep me from depression. That was the point when I started to write and left a bit aside the reading part.

I understand having little time for reading anymore. I am glad that you found an outlet for your thoughts and feelings. Do you have a specific genre you write for?
I prefer to dabble in several genres, but they have all something in common, which is a deep introspection of the characters.

So, you are self published, what brought you to make that decision? Were you always planning to self publish?
As I had my novel finished, including the polishing and copyediting process, I started to look for an agent, but most of them didn’t have time to take other authors, and most of the publishing houses didn’t accept unsolicited writers. I believed in my novel, and I want it to be published, so I self-published with CreateSpace by Amazon. I do believe I still have a lot to learn about being an indie author, but I am ready for the challenge.

I am certain you will accomplish your goals. When not writing, how do you spend your time?
Since I’ve lost my day job in December, I am now fully absorbed by marketing and writing. When I don’t do that, you can find me alone in the woods, recharging my inner batteries in connection with the nature. I love photography, and I do believe that it has a lot in common with writing. They are two different channels, but they both tell a story.

A long walk in the woods, communing with nature, sounds great about now. I agree that photography can tell a story as well as the written word. I understand you have one more passion, and a funny story to go with it. Tell us about it.
I love to travel, and I travel in the most unusual destinations one can find, from conflict areas to out-of-this-world places, even if sometimes I like to indulge in more “normal” tourist destinations. By traveling, I have been gathering most of the inspiration for my novels, as I have met very interesting people and cultures. Perhaps the funniest anecdote is the trip on the night boat across the Kivu Lake in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We were supposed to leave with the morning ferry, but it didn’t get the permission to sail (!)
Funny is that personally, I wouldn’t have given the permission either to the night boat, as it was something that barely could float, and it was mostly used to transport every sort of goods and livestock. It has been a long night, I can tell you, but it was worth, and many times I am thinking about Africa, and all the times, I miss it a lot.

Sounds like an exciting life you lead. Good luck in your travels and your writing. If anyone would like to check out P.J. Mann’s work, or keep up with her travels you can do so at the below links.

Website: http://paperpenandinkwell.blogspot.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/PJ.Mann.paperpenandinkwell/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/PjMann2016
Amazon Author Page: amazon.com/author/pjmann
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PJMann

roughdiamond-pjmann Check it out on Amazon Today

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