Meet The Author Monday – Randi Lynn Mrvos

My Gentle Readers, I have an author dedicated to children to introduce you to today. Randi Lynn Mrvos produces an online children’s magazine called, Kid’s Imagination Train. She released her first children’s picture book August 23rd, 2017. As usual, my comments/questions will be in BLUE and Randi Lynn’s will be in GREEN.

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It’s so nice to have you here today, Randi. It’s not often I get to talk to children’s book writers, and your magazine looks amazing. Let’s begin at the beginning, as they say. What dropped you into the literary world? Were you an avid reader from a young age or was it later in life?
I was a voracious reader when I was young.  During the summers, my brothers and I had “reading wars” to see which one of us could read the most books.  Back then, my favorite books were by Charles Dickens and Jules Verne.  On the other hand, I gave up reading books for fun after graduating as a medical technologist because I got burned out on studying.  However, a few years later that changed when I witnessed a blind man crossing a busy New York City street.  That’s when it dawned on me that I could open a book and read it; whereas, he would never see the words on a page. 

Very inspiring, and very true. So you started with two of the greats, what draws you in these days now that you have returned to world of reading?
Pulitzer Prize winning novels and children’s picture books are my favorite kinds of books as well as the hilarious books by Sempé-Goscinny.

Have to keep an eye on what’s out there if you are going to write for children. When did you start considering the path of being a writer?
The seed for writing was planted when I took a creative writing class in the tenth grade.  Believe it or not, I still have my writing journal complete with stories that were inspired by magazine pictures.  

I remember doing some of those exercises as well. Seems to be a standard fit for high school english, especially for creative writing portions of the year. Where did you go from these early years of magazine inspiration?
In the early days of my career, I wrote technical articles for medical technology journals, testing passages for elementary-age children for Pearson Digital Learning, and science articles for children.  After widely publishing nonfiction, I pursued my dream of writing fiction for kids.

How did this dream of writing fiction for kids lead you to where you are now?
Every single picture book that I wrote was rejected.  Since I was dying to see my work in print, I found it was easier to get magazine articles published because nonfiction was less subjective than fiction.  As my credits grew, I focused on developing the craft of writing fiction for kids by taking writing classes, attending writing workshops and conferences, and joining a professional writer’s organization.  Though this helped me to grow as a writer, I still couldn’t find a publisher for my stories.  I desperately wanted to get out of this rut, so I hired editorial consultant Mary Kole.  We worked on my favorite manuscript, and several months later, I sent it to five publishers.  Not long after, the creative director for Saturn’s Moon Press sent me a contract for Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show-and-Tell.

That’s wonderful that you found a home for one of your stories. All the effort and work you put in has paid off it seems. When you aren’t writing for children, how do you like to spend your time?
Marketing my first picture book takes up beaucoup de time as well as being the editor of Kid’s Imagination e-zine.  I enjoy traveling, taking ballet and learning how to parlez-vous French. 

I’ll leave the French to you. I took German in school and can’t really speak a lick of it anymore. I understand that you have a little story to share with us?
Last fall, my husband and I decided to celebrate our birthdays in New Orleans.  When we arrived in the Big Easy, we biked through NOLA, listened to jazz, and chowed down Cajun food.  Often, our footsteps led us through Jackson Square.  There, we found people playing music, drawing portraits, taking carriage rides, and having their fortunes read.  I was itching to meet a fortune-teller.  I selected a psychic, who she invited me to sit at her table.  She told me to choose a jeweled stone and three cards, and make three wishes.  One of my wishes was to get a book published.  After she studied the cards and the stone, she told me good things were going to happen.

The next evening, I scrolled through my emails.  I discovered an email from a publisher.  It was from the creative director of a Cactus Moon Publications.  She wrote that she liked my book!  Sometimes, wishes really do come true.

Amazing and congratulations on your successes. Thank you again for stopping by. If anyone would like to get more information about Randi Lynn Mrvos and her work for children, you can find her at the below links.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter @RandiLynnMrvos
Pinterest
Kid’s Imagination Train.

If any of you would like to be featured on Meet the Author Monday, you can get more information by clicking HERE.

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Meet The Author Monday – William Fietzer

Today my Gentle Readers, I have a new author for you to meet. His name is William Fietzer and he has three titles available on Amazon exploring such topics as crime and technology, with his latest adding in paranormal and the concept of a collective unconsciousness. As usual, my comments/questions will be in BLUE and we will have William’s responses in GREEN.

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William, thank you for stopping by to talk to us and share a little about yourself and your work. You have some diversity in your portfolio already. What got you started in the literary world?
Gosh, I think it goes back years ago to my babysitter (a elementary ed teacher) who read to her own slightly older children (before the age of day care) and I wanted in. After that, my parents, grade-school teachers, and librarians encouraged me to read and I had them read (and later on read myself) all of Aesop’s fables and Black Beauty (wotta tear-jerker) to me.
After I discovered Walter Farley‘s books and devoured all of them in print, I began to write my first novel, “Black Phantom,” a story that never got beyond the cover design though I still promise myself to fill the covers with a manuscript.
After that I read anything that came my way and decided to become an English major in college. But it was really during my stint in the army that I completed reading all the popular writers like Norman Mailer, James Baldwin, and Ken Kesey along with “disreputable” ones like D. H. Lawrence, Henry Miller, and William Burroughs to complete my literary education.
Since then, I’ve come to consider Marcel Proust (for his style and breadth of thought), Graham Greene (for the variety of his characters and settings), and Colin Wilson (for his concept of the outsider and his investigations of the paranormal) as role models. Oh, and Raymond Chandler just because.

Bit of a whirlwind tour of great authors there. I’ll have to link them up for my readers to follow along with your journey if they choose. Do you find yourself gravitating towards a particular genre these days?
I don’t consider myself a genre reader. I just read what interests me at the moment. That may be anything from metaphysical fiction to forensic anthropology. My reading may not be as broad as it was earlier in my life, but I read much more deeply and intensely.

All this reading seems to have inspired you, as you started a novel early in your life. What truly pushed you over that line from just reading great stories, to wanting to put your own into the world?
I mentioned before my first (unsuccessful) attempt at writing a novel. Though I aspired to become a writer during my undergraduate days, it took me years to shake off the inhibitions incurred as a graduate student of English before I gained enough confidence to write and complete a work of fiction.
I edited and wrote for several pre-professional library publications during this period, but it was only after I submitted (one minute before the deadline) a teleplay to a local PBS station contest that I gained the confidence to complete a full-length fiction manuscript. And then it was another fifteen years before my first novel, “Penal Fires,” was published.

Sometimes it takes awhile to get that first story into the world before the floodgates open. With the breadth of your reading history, do you find yourself drawn to write any particular genre, or are you looking at diversifying there as well?
I’ve written in several, starting out as a traditional mystery/thriller writer and graduating (some might say devolving) into a metaphysical writer.

As long as it is the stories you want to tell, who cares whether the critics think you graduated or devolved, right? So, three books under your belt but that’s not all for your literary career. How did your journey play out?
If you’ve read this far (Good for you–such endurance!), you’ll notice a progression in content from literary fiction to what I call visionary thriller. My first story, “Special Training,” was based on a tragic experience witnessed during the Vietnam War. My teleplay, “A Question of Benefit,” was based on a person I encountered during this same period. Both of them are what I’d say were in the mainstream literary tradition.
But as with graduate school, I chafed at the restrictions and conventions placed upon the writers of this genre. My life experiences showed me there were many more interesting people and topics to write about than sensitive loners learning to expiate the slights (real and imagined) against them through writing.
That’s when I discovered Raymond Chandler. Though in retrospect I realize his writing is as stylized and conventional as much of the stuffy stuff I was reading in graduate school, his attitude (or voice) and subject matter were a breath of fresh air to me. I could never write about the mean streets his characters explored, but I could adapt those situations to my own experiences and find my own, not-so-sardonic voice.
My first novel, “Penal Fires” was the result. An outpouring of my experiences in Madison, Wisconsin both before and after the bombing of Bascom Hall, the book is a conventional mystery thriller.
A few years later, my second novel, “Metadata Murders,” extended the tropes of the mystery thriller into the realm of the Dark Web where the hidden, almost fantastical powers of the Internet could make anything possible in real life–even murder.
And finally, my latest novel, “Mission: Soul Rescue,” takes the almost mystical possibilities of the Internet one step farther by exploring the potentials and complexities of accessing and releasing the power of the unconscious mind, not to mention the danger from the psychic vampires who feed off such energy.

Fascinating journey William. I’m sure you have more ‘devolving’ to do as you continue your writing path. When you put down the keyboard, or pen, what do you like to do? What keeps you busy outside of writing?
I’ve been retired for several years from my roles as a cataloger and bibliographer for the University of Minnesota Libraries, as an instructor of English and business writing for Rasmussen and National American Universities, and as a contributor and reviewer for the online news site, examiner.com.
Currently, on those days not devoted to writing, I play golf and serve as president of the senior league at Highland Nine golf course in St. Paul, Minnesota. My wife and I also visit our sons and daughters-in-law on the East Coast and recently welcomed our first grandchild, a boy, into the world in March of this year, all of which has made our Norwegian Forest cat, mightily perplexed and annoyed by our occasional abdications of fealty to her needs and desires.

Cats can be fairly territorial when it comes to the loyalty of their subjects. Congratulations on the grandchild. I’m certain he will keep you busy. I know you have an interesting tale to tell with regards to your latest work, so let’s hear it.
This is one of those situations like being in an elevator with an agent and you have 90 seconds to “wow” him/her with the essence of your story. When I attended ThrillerFest the first time, I managed to be successful in convincing eight agents to look at my manuscript. But each of them returned it, saying something noncommittal like it didn’t meet their current needs.
But one advised me to join a writing group and get other people’s reactions to what I’d written. Their comments and those of the editor my future publisher recommended helped me realize the limitations of the manuscript I originally submitted.
With their comments as a guide, I converted a promising manuscript into one acceptable enough to a publisher for me to sign a contract. From there it was only a short 18 months and numerous rewrites that transformed that unmarketable manuscript into “Mission: Soul Rescue.”

That is great, William. Sometimes a rejection can open a different door and I’m glad it worked out for you. If anyone would like to get their hands on more information about William Fietzer and his works, or keep up with any future releases, you can find him at the links below.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter @ELstir1
William Fietzer on Amazon

 

If any of you are thinking, “Hey, I would like to be on Meet the Author Monday” then you can check out the details HERE.

Meet The Author Monday – Kirsten McKenzie

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I want to thank you stopping by to talk with us today, Kirsten. Let’s kick things off with a little background. What brought you to the world of literature?
My father was an antique dealer, so my bedroom was stuffed full of hardcover copies of almost every Enid Blyton book ever printed, and numerous other classics. I always had something to read. It’d because of Enid Blyton’s books that I developed a love of reading and storytelling. And its because of my father that my books are stuff full of antiques!

That sounds like an exciting childhood. What genre, or genres, really draw you in?
Sweeping historical fiction, in the vein of Edward Rutherfurd’s huge tomes – London, Paris, Sarum etc. His storytelling is incredible especially the way he weaves all the threads together.

I’ve never been one to read fantasy books, until I read George RR Martin’s Game of Thrones series. His descriptive details are perfect.

And Stephen King of course. All his books, even the ones I have to read with my eyes closed because I’m too scared…

Of course the King of Horror. One of my all time favorites as well. Is there any particular event that brought you across that line from reader to writer?
The Discovery of Witches series by Deborah Harkness are the books which inspired me to write. Is there anything more exciting than the ability to slip through time? To meet someone inspirational from the past?

Deborah Harkness has a wonderful series there. I have read some of her work. Have you chosen a specific genre or are you dabbling in more than one? 
I’ve written two historical time slip books, and I am about to publish my first horror novel. So yes, you can safely assume that I am dabbling in genres now.

A double threat then. How has your publishing journey been?
My first two books were published by Accent Press in the UK.
My horror novel will be published by Squabbling Sparrows Press in New Zealand due to it being a horror novel, and not historical fiction.

That’s great. When you aren’t taking on two genres, what fills your time?
My Twitter bio sums it up really:

Author. Actor. Antique Dealer. Mother. Wife. World Traveler.

I love traveling. I’m a full time author. The mother of two daughters. And the wife of a husband. I don’t do as much acting now as I did before publishing my books. And I will always love antiques, and the thrill of stumbling across some piece of treasure hidden in a drawer or a forgotten box.

Sounds like you have a full plate. I understand you have a story you want to share with us about your father’s antique shop. Please do.
When I was little, I was allowed to sell 50c postcards in the corner of our family antique shop. Then I progressed to being behind the counter. After my father died, my brother and I ran the shop together. Now I write about the things in the shop, and the customers, and the treasures, weaving stories around them. Its a passion, and it filters through to all aspects of my writing. A reviewer once described my writing as “Antiques Roadshow gone viral”.

Certainly looks like you have some interesting reads for our To Be Read pile. Thank you again for stopping by today Kirsten and I wish you luck with your work. If anyone would like to follow Kirsten and her work, you can do so at the following links.
And if anyone would like to be a part of our Meet the Author Monday feature, you can sign up by clicking HERE.

Meet the Author Monday – P.J. Mann

Today my Gentle Readers, I would like to introduce you to P. J. Mann. I’m excited for you to meet this fellow indie author, so let’s get to it. My questions/comments will be in BLUE and P.J.’s will be in GREEN.
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P.J. I love your graphic on your Facebook and website. Thank you for coming to visit with me today. It’s always fascinating to learn what started off authors as readers. How did it begin for you?
What made me a reader was just the passion of reading since the elementary school. I loved the places I could visit without even the need of moving away from my room. Perhaps I started to read less when I started to be a writer, mostly it is a lack of time. Being an indie author means that I have to do all the marketing on my own together with trying and produce something new, and that is a full-time activity that leaves little time for the rest.

Self Publishing, they tell us it is hard work but we all think it will be different. I know how that goes myself. So what genres do you enjoy the most?
Mainly I like crime and mystery, but also comedy books or erotica.

When did you decide you were not content just to read the works of other authors and wanted to create your own?
I started to write since I was a teenager, but that was not something meant to be a professional work. Mostly it was to discharge frustrations and to analyze myself. The real turning point was a few years ago, when life seemed to be a downhill road, and I needed something to keep me from depression. That was the point when I started to write and left a bit aside the reading part.

I understand having little time for reading anymore. I am glad that you found an outlet for your thoughts and feelings. Do you have a specific genre you write for?
I prefer to dabble in several genres, but they have all something in common, which is a deep introspection of the characters.

So, you are self published, what brought you to make that decision? Were you always planning to self publish?
As I had my novel finished, including the polishing and copyediting process, I started to look for an agent, but most of them didn’t have time to take other authors, and most of the publishing houses didn’t accept unsolicited writers. I believed in my novel, and I want it to be published, so I self-published with CreateSpace by Amazon. I do believe I still have a lot to learn about being an indie author, but I am ready for the challenge.

I am certain you will accomplish your goals. When not writing, how do you spend your time?
Since I’ve lost my day job in December, I am now fully absorbed by marketing and writing. When I don’t do that, you can find me alone in the woods, recharging my inner batteries in connection with the nature. I love photography, and I do believe that it has a lot in common with writing. They are two different channels, but they both tell a story.

A long walk in the woods, communing with nature, sounds great about now. I agree that photography can tell a story as well as the written word. I understand you have one more passion, and a funny story to go with it. Tell us about it.
I love to travel, and I travel in the most unusual destinations one can find, from conflict areas to out-of-this-world places, even if sometimes I like to indulge in more “normal” tourist destinations. By traveling, I have been gathering most of the inspiration for my novels, as I have met very interesting people and cultures. Perhaps the funniest anecdote is the trip on the night boat across the Kivu Lake in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We were supposed to leave with the morning ferry, but it didn’t get the permission to sail (!)
Funny is that personally, I wouldn’t have given the permission either to the night boat, as it was something that barely could float, and it was mostly used to transport every sort of goods and livestock. It has been a long night, I can tell you, but it was worth, and many times I am thinking about Africa, and all the times, I miss it a lot.

Sounds like an exciting life you lead. Good luck in your travels and your writing. If anyone would like to check out P.J. Mann’s work, or keep up with her travels you can do so at the below links.

Website: http://paperpenandinkwell.blogspot.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/PJ.Mann.paperpenandinkwell/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/PjMann2016
Amazon Author Page: amazon.com/author/pjmann
Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PJMann

roughdiamond-pjmann Check it out on Amazon Today

You too can be featured on Meet the Author Monday’s by clicking HERE and filling out the questionnaire.

Meet The Author Monday – Douglas L. Wilson

I know. I know. Our Meet The Author Monday feature has been a little MIA. But I have a great author for you to meet today, Douglas L. Wilson. His first published novel, Affinity’s Window, is available on Amazon. Let’s dive in shall we? Per the usual, my questions/comments will be in BLUE and Douglas will be in GREEN.

Thank you for stopping by Douglas. I always like to start off by asking my interviewees: What turned you into a reader or non-reader?
I’ve been reading for entertainment since grade school, and I am never NOT reading a novel. My earliest recollections are Dickens, and possibly Charlotte’s Web, but from then on I devoured everything I could get my hands on, from Sidney Sheldon to Stephen King. I love a good story, in any genre, and I can’t imagine a world without fiction.

A good story in any genre. I think we are cut from the same cloth. There is probably a favorite or two though. Tell us about them.
Horror and suspense thrillers. I eat em like candy. I’m also into fantasy, like Weiss and Hickman, and some sci-fi, but I’ll always come home to King and McCammon.

King is definitely King for a reason. At some point you crossed that line from reader into writer. What crossed you over?
I can remember a time, as a teenager, thinking about stories I’d read, and enjoyed, and trying to redesign the plots in my head. I’d even started jotting down story ideas, but my life took a turn down a much different path. I didn’t come back to writing until I was fifty years old. I missed a lot in those years, and I wish I could turn back time, but I’m writing now, and I’ll never stop.

I am sure your life experiences have helped you with your writing. Knowing your reading proclivities, do you have a specific genre you consider yourself a writer of?
Yes. My first love has always been horror. I’ve dabbled with a few ideas in other genres, but I always turn back to my one true love.

So, how did this journey begin for you?
I wrote my first novel five years ago. It was 330,000 words. I had no idea how this industry worked. My queries were deleted out of hand. While the story was good, the length was ridiculous. Then I had an agent take pity on me. She liked the story, so she told me what I’d been doing wrong. I was flabbergasted, and distraught. Taking her advice, and this wasn’t easy for me, I wrote another novel called Affinity’s Window. The agent loved it and signed me right away. She’s still my agent today, and my hero. Thanks to her kindness, and her belief in me, I’m a published author, but boy did I have a lot to learn.

That’s amazing. The world needs more agents like yours. Perhaps I will have to look her up someday myself. Outside of writing, how do you like to spend your time?
When I’m not writing, I generally putter around the house. My wife and I live with our two cats, and together the four of us lead a quiet life. I’m retired now, so writing does consume most of my time, it’s what makes me happy. 

Affinity’s Window is my third novel. I’ve since turned my original novel, that 330,000 word monstrosity, into two separate novels which will be sequels to Affinity’s Window. I’m currently finishing up my fourth novel, a story unrelated to the first three, and I’ve already started a fifth. Sometimes I flit around between stories, I can’t help myself sometimes, but eventually I land on something I can finish. It’s weird, but once I get going on an idea, if it’s a good one, the story just kind of takes over and directs me where to go. I feel like a conduit sometimes, but that’s okay. The story’s being told one way or the other.

It’s great to have that time to do what makes you happy and I wish you the best of luck with your works. Sometimes we just have to let the muses do their thing.

If anyone would like to check out Douglas’s novel, Affinity’s Window, you can do so on Amazon at the link below the picture. You can also connect with him on Facebook or Goodreads.

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Affinity’s Window on Amazon

 

You too can be featured on Meet The Author Monday by clicking HERE and filling out the questionnaire.

Meet The Author Monday – Bracha Goetz

Today my Gentle Readers, we have Bracha Goetz, a children’s picture book author. In our usual style here we will put my questions/comments in BLUE, with Bracha’s responses in GREEN.

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Thanks for stopping by today, Bracha. I must say you are my first children’s book author. It’s not a genre I normally read myself, but as my daughter grows up I am sure I will have to become familiar with the genre so I have something to read to her. What brought you into the literary world?
I loved picture books as a child – and they are still my favorite books to read!

Picture books, huh. Well, I think you covered my usual next question of what genre excites you the most.
Picture books – the less words, the better! 🙂

So, what made you want to cross the line from reading to publishing your own?
When I won the Junior McCalls’ contest for McCall’s Magazine as a 12-year-old, and my poem appeared in the magazine, I understood that people all over could hopefully benefit from my writing.

Wow, winning awards and published at 12 years old? Impressive. Do you still write a lot of poetry or do you dabble in other genres now?
I write articles for magazines or for websites online on important issues when I feel “somebody’s got to do it” but I much prefer to write picture books.

So, we’ve established that picture books are your bread and butter. Tell us a little about your work in that arena.
I’m the author of 33 picture books that help children’s souls shine, with a whole bunch more under contract. I love making deep spiritual concepts clear to children in a delightfully simple way.

For years, I only had books for Jewish children accepted for publication, but now my books for the general public are just beginning to get published too.

33 picture books published? That’s quite the pedigree. It’s wonderful that you tackle such a potentially hot topic such as spirituality for an audience so young. When you aren’t trying to enliven children’s lives with your work, how do you spend your time?
I’m the mother of six children who are all now parents, and my husband and I are enjoying our many grandchildren. I coordinate a Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters program in Baltimore, Maryland, and I love practicing yoga every wonderful day.

I’m not your typical Harvard grad ’cause chapter books are a bit much for me. I like expressing big ideas in little words.

Sounds like you keep a full plate, congratulations on your growing family and I hope you continue to bring light to children’s lives. If anyone would like to find more information on Bracha’s body of work, and connect with her, you can do so at the links below.

Website
Facebook Page
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

If any authors out there would like to be featured on Meet The Author Monday, you can get more information by Clicking Here.

Meet The Author Monday – Melissa Carrigee

Today my Gentle Readers, we have Melissa Carrigee, an editor and creative director for a small publishing company, who has her own debut book coming out this year. In our usual style here we will put my questions/comments in BLUE, with Melissa’s responses in GREEN.

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Melissa, thank you for stopping by to chat with us today. Let’s get the ball rolling with an easy one. How did you get your start as a reader?
I started off as an avid reader when I was young. The teenage years I was too busy with boys to be bothered with books. In my twenties I picked up Glory Lane by Alan Dean Foster and that was it. I knew my passion was books and reading.

Sounds like one I will have to check out when I get some free time. What genre, or genres, do you enjoy the most?
I love horror and thrillers but I read anything. I love children’s stories and have a huge collection.

Variety is the spice of life they say. What brought you to the other side of the page? From reading the stories of others to writing your own?
I think when I read Glory Lane I started becoming a writer. I had always written when I was young, poems and short stories as a way to deal with my crazy emotions but after I read Glory Lane I started putting all the components together and outlining bigger stories. That is when I became a writer.

Do have plans to stick with the genre your debut is in? Or do you have plans to expand your repertoire?
No. I don’t want to pigeonhole myself into any one genre.

Varied reading and writing tastes, how exciting. I hope you will keep us informed of new releases as they become available. How did you get your start in the literary world?
I worked as a literary agent for almost two years trying to expand my knowledge of the business. I got to know a lot of people in the business. I started to attend conferences. I was then offered a job at an upcoming new, independent publisher over their children’s book line. I accepted that job and now I am involved in all aspects of getting a book published. Some people might think it would make it easier for me as a writer but it actually has made it tougher.

What do you do when you are not writing?
I work as the editor and creative director of a small publisher. I have one boy in the Air Force and another in junior high school. I also have a bulldog who keeps me busy.

Very exciting. I have a son in junior high as well. Busy time transitioning from elementary to a more grown up regimen of homework and studying. You had something else about your debut to tell us, correct?
My book is out for pre-sale right now but won’t be officially released until August 2017.

I wrote I Dream of Dragons when I was in college getting a graphic design degree. It was for an illustration class. I remember hating the illustrating part but I absolutely loved writing the story and the outcome. I wrote the story for my son, who is now in the Air Force.

Please thank your son for his service. And thank you again for stopping by to talk with me today. Keep us posted on your upcoming work. If anyone would like to find out more about Melissa’s book and even pre-order it, you can find her at the below links.

Website

Facebook Page

GoodReads

Pinterest

If any authors out there would like to be featured on Meet The Author Monday, you can get more information by Clicking Here.